Bernard Quinn likeness

Bernard Quinn cap badgePrivate Bernard Quinn

10th (Service) Battalion Gordon Highlanders
Service No: S/4702

Bernard Quinn grave

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Personal details

Family Information

Son of Patrick Quinn and Margaret Quinn of 2c North Bute St, Whifflet, Coatbridge. Bernard's younger brother Private Thomas Quinn (S/7844) of the 9th (Service) Battalion Seaforth Highlanders Died of Wounds on the 30/12/1916. Another brother Private James Quinn of the Royal Scots Fusiliers also served and survived. From the 1901 Census - Address - 186 Calder St, Coatbridge - Patrick Quinn aged 47, Margaret Quinn aged 46, Bernard Quinn aged 17, Patrick Quinn aged 15, Peter Quinn aged 12, Margaret Quinn aged 11, John Quinn aged 9, James Quinn aged 5, Thomas Quinn aged 5, Michael Quinn aged 9 months. Bernard's Pension was awarded to his mother Margaret.

Born / Resided

Middlesborough / 2c North Bute St, Whifflet, Coatbridge

Died

Killed in Action on the 25/09/1915 on the opening day of the Battle of Loos

Enlisted

Whifflet, Coatbridge 1914

Employed

Fencing Department of the Lochrin Iron Works previously a Tube Work Labourer

Age

31

Buried / Remembered

Loos Memorial (Panel 115 to 119), Pas de Calais, France

Cemetery / Memorial Information

The Loos Memorial commemorates over 20,000 officers and men who have no known grave, who fell in the area from the River Lys to the old southern boundary of the First Army, east and west of Grenay, from the first day of the Battle of Loos to the end of the war. On either side of the cemetery is a wall 15 feet high, to which are fixed tablets on which are carved the names of those commemorated. At the back are four small circular courts, open to the sky, in which the lines of tablets are continued, and between these courts are three semicircular walls or apses, two of which carry tablets, while on the centre apse is erected the Cross of Sacrifice.

Additional Information

Bernard and the Battalion arrived at Boulogne on the 09/07/1915 and were part of the 44th Brigade, 15th (Scottish) Division. Bernard was Killed in Action on the opening day of the Battle of Loos, 25th September – 15th October 1915 : The first genuinely large scale British offensive action but once again only in a supporting role to a larger French attack in the Third Battle of Artois. British appeals that the ground over which they were being called upon to advance was wholly unsuitable were rejected. The battle is historically noteworthy for the first British use of poison gas. The Order of Battle - Battle of Loos 25/9/1915 - 08/10/1915. Gas release to be made along Divisional Front from 5.50am with Zero hour set for 6.30am. In the first instance, Brigade to secure the German front-line area known as, ‘The Jews Nose’, and then press on to secure the enemy’s second-line east of Loos village. Once these objectives had been captured, surviving troops were to press on and secure Hill 70. The Brigade was to attack with 9th Black Watch right and 8th Seaforth Highlanders left, both supported by 7th Cameron Highlanders. The 10th Gordon Highlanders were to be held in reserve. and 8th Seaforth Highlanders left, both supported by 7th Cameron Highlanders. 10th Gordon Highlanders were to be held in reserve. On the 24/9/1915 Brigade to assembly trenches. ‘A’ Company vanguard. On the 25/9/1915 at 5.50am gas release commenced followed by smoke release. Germany artillery responded immediately fearful of a British attack. At that time the wind changed, and the lethal gas blew back on the troops mustering to go ‘over the top’ at 6.30am, causing significant casualties and confusion. At the appointed time, the 9th Black Watch went into the attack and carried its initial objectives under heavy fire, suffering further significant casualties. By 8.30am, troops had begun to assault Hill 70, and later in the day attempts were made to press on to Cite St. Auguste and Dinamentiere. FROM THE 10th (SERVICE) BATTALION WAR DIARY 25/09/1915 : 5.50am - From this time there was a discharge of gas and smoke candles lasting nearly 40 minutes. It was accompanied by a heavy shrapnel bombardment by the enemy first and second lines. At 6.30am the assaulting columns went over the parapet. At 6.40 our leading companies left the trenches and reached LOOS with slight loss at 7am. Here they had some street fighting and the bombers did some good work in the cellars. All units got mixed up in the village but formed into line again when clear of it. They then advanced on to HILL 70 where they established themselves in the reverse slope with the 7th CAMERONS at about 11.30am. "I" and "M" companies advanced along with parties of several other units over the crest of HILL 70. They were however held up by strong barbed wire, and a scathing machine gun and rifle fire was opened on them. After holding this position for over four hours they were forced to retire over the crest and re-join the other line late in the afternoon. The position was held on HILL 70 all through the night against constant counter attacks. Two of the machine guns did excellent work on the left of the line. The other two had followed their companies over the crest, one was lost and the other damaged". See photos x 2 for the BATTALION WAR DIARY for the 25/09/1915 and for REPORTS OF OPERATIONS 25th/26th September x 18. Also see photos for 12 pages on the Battle from the 15TH (SCOTTISH) DIVISION BOOK. Scottish Regiments lost a huge amount of brave men at Loos. Here is a list of Infantry Battalions who lost more than 500 men at the Battle of Loos from 25/09/1915 to 16/10/1915 - 7th Cameron Highlanders 687, of which 19 Officers, 9th Black Watch 680, of which 20 Officers, 6th King’s Own Scottish Borderers 650, of which 20 Officers, 10th Highland Light Infantry 648, of which 20 Officers, 7th King’s Own Scottish Borderers 631, of which 20 Officers, 8th Devons 619, of which 19 Officers, 8th Royal West Kents 580, of which 24 Officers, 8th Buffs 558, of which 24 Officers, 12th Highland Light Infantry 553, of which 23 Officers, 8th Black Watch 511, of which 19 Officers, 5th North Staffordshire 505, of which 20 Officers, 8th Seaforth Highlanders 502, of which 23 Officers. THE 10TH BATTALION GORDON HIGHLANDERS LOST 381, OF WHICH 7 OFFICERS. Bernard was another of the men from the Coatbridge Memorial Killed in Action on the opening day of the Battle of Loos. He was 1 of 99 men from the Coatbridge Memorial who fell during and from injuries from the Battle of Loos. See Directory for Bernard's brother Thomas' page. Bernard is also remembered on the St Mary's Church Roll of Honour with his brother James (see photos). See photos for Bernard's Medal Index Card, his Army Register of Soldiers Effects, his Service Medal and Award Rolls x 2, his CWGC Grave Registration, his name on the Loos Memorial Panel List, his name on the Loos Memorial, Bernard's Pension Records x 3 (listed with his brother Thomas) and the Gordon Highlanders Cap Badge. Finally many thanks to Tommy O'Brien of Horwich near Bolton who looks after the brothers Medals and kindly sent the photos. Finally, I have the Battalion War Diary from July 1915 to May 1916. If you're looking for information from it please contact me.

Photos
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War Diaries

The battalion War Diary is available on the National Archives website.

Creative Commons License

We have made this information and the images available under a Creative Commons BY-NC license. This means you may reuse it for non-commercial purposes only and must attribute it to us using the following statement: © coatbridgeandthegreatwar.com

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